Our History

Our History 

Having a strong connection with theater and with a strong conviction to make a difference in the lives of the youth in our community, a nomadic theater group was born. In 1998 The Ague Spring Players was created to offer kids an opportunity to perform. Kids from all walks of life joined us, some with acting experience, most without. Something happened, something I think called community. People joined together and put on shows with what we had, nothing fancy, just art that was available to all people. Our space was the Haddam Neck Grange Hall that we converted into a working theater, and we called it our home for four years. Productions grew bigger asmore youth joined us and we were in need of a permanent home. We explored a variety of performance spaces, and performed in old factories, a camp rec hall, and a school. Knowing we needed to put down roots, we found a home in 2005, a 42,000 square foot factory building that we could transform into a working theater. To our surprise, our community took off and our new space allowed us to expand our programs and to reach more students through different art forms. We grew into what is now known as Epoch Arts, a non-profit arts for youth organization. Serving over 500 students annually and over 1,000 people in our community, we offer art programs that make a difference, including classes in film, theater, music and art. We host community events such as our annual tag sale, Haunted House, Art Response, Brookside Nights, Poetry Nights, Open Mic and Paint nights. We have a special program called Breaking Silences for teen girls. These are just some of the ways we have been serving our community and our youth since 1998. We are continually growing and making positive changes through the arts.

unfinishedpeople_posterart_v08.jpg

Thanks for coming to Unfinished People-2017

The original play, Unfinished People, focused on issues of social and economic differences, it looked at what causes separation, what distracts us from community involvement and how we can educate ourselves on issues that we know nothing about. It talked about characters who lived in a perfect diverse society, but when they are pulled out of that society and forced to look at the real world,they are shocked at how broken the world really is. "The play tackled current social and economic issues, as well as addressed the drug problems in this world that others seem to ignore. It taught us that we need to be passionate and active members of our community, instead of being distracted by superficial things,” says actor Megan Crotty. The play asked the question of how we spend our time, what superficial things we fill it up with and should we be investing in people, rather than things. Sixteen year old cast member Robin Leet explained, “This isn't your average play. This show discusses important, sparsely spoken of issues, such as drugs, addiction and what it can do to a person, and the unhealthy things we consume ourselves with in daily life. We will speak of the vacancy in relationships and people caused by cell phones and other casual, everyday devices.We break down barriers you might not even know were there and bring attention to poverty, the middle to lower class, and how these issues can affect our community as a whole.”